Highlights

 
Quotable
We must pursue peaceful end through peaceful means.
Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
Original Letters Blog US Casualties Contact Donate

 
December 30, 2007

2007 Worst Year Yet in Iraq


by Dahr Jamail

Despite all the claims of improvements, 2007 has been the worst year yet in Iraq.

One of the first big moves this year was the launch of a troop "surge" by the U.S. government in mid-February. The goal was to improve security in Baghdad and the western al-Anbar province, the two most violent areas. By June, an additional 28,000 troops had been deployed to Iraq, bringing the total number up to more than 160,000.

By autumn, there were over 175,000 U.S. military personnel in Iraq. This is the highest number of U.S. troops deployed yet, and while the U.S. government continues to talk of withdrawing some, the numbers on the ground appear to contradict these promises.

The Bush administration said the "surge" was also aimed at curbing sectarian killings, and to gain time for political reform for the government of U.S.-backed Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki.

During the surge, the number of Iraqis displaced from their homes quadrupled, according to the Iraqi Red Crescent. By the end of 2007, the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) estimated that there are over 2.3 million internally displaced persons within Iraq, and over 2.3 million Iraqis who have fled the country.

Iraq has a population around 25 million.

The non-governmental organization Refugees International describes Iraq's refugee problem as "the world's fastest growing refugee crisis."

In October the Syrian government began requiring visas for Iraqis. Until then it was the only country to allow Iraqis in without visas. The new restrictions have led some Iraqis to return to Baghdad, but that number is well below 50,000.

A recent UNHCR survey of families returning found that less than 18 percent did so by choice. Most came back because they lacked a visa, had run out of money abroad, or were deported.

Sectarian killings have decreased in recent months, but still continue. Bodies continue to be dumped on the streets of Baghdad daily.

One reason for a decrease in the level of violence is that most of Baghdad has essentially been divided along sectarian lines. Entire neighborhoods are now surrounded by concrete blast walls several meters high, with strict security checkpoints. Normal life has all but vanished.

The Iraqi Red Crescent estimates that eight out of ten refugees are from Baghdad.

By the end of 2007, attacks against occupation forces decreased substantially, but still number more than 2,000 monthly. Iraqi infrastructure, like supply of potable water and electricity are improving, but remain below pre-invasion levels. Similarly with jobs and oil exports. Unemployment, according to the Iraqi government, ranges between 60-70 percent.

An Oxfam International report released in July says 70 percent of Iraqis lack access to safe drinking water, and 43 percent live on less than a dollar a day. The report also states that eight million Iraqis are in need of emergency assistance.

"Iraqis are suffering from a growing lack of food, shelter, water and sanitation, healthcare, education, and employment," the report says. "Of the four million Iraqis who are dependent on food assistance, only 60 percent currently have access to rations through the government-run Public Distribution System (PDS), down from 96 percent in 2004."

Nearly 10 million people depend on the fragile rationing system. In December, the Iraqi government announced it would cut the number of items in the food ration from ten to five due to "insufficient funds and spiraling inflation." The inflation rate is officially said to be around 70 percent.

The cuts are to be introduced in the beginning of 2008, and have led to warnings of social unrest if measures are not taken to address rising poverty and unemployment.

Iraq's children continue to suffer most. Child malnutrition rates have increased from 19 percent during the economic sanctions period prior to the invasion, to 28 percent today.

This year has also been one of the bloodiest of the entire occupation. The group Just Foreign Policy, "an independent and non-partisan mass membership organization dedicated to reforming U.S. foreign policy," estimates the total number of Iraqis killed so far due to the U.S.-led invasion and occupation to be 1,139,602.

This year 894 U.S. soldiers have been killed in Iraq, making 2007 the deadliest year of the entire occupation for the U.S. military, according to ICasualties.org.

To date, at least 3,896 U.S. troops have been killed in Iraq, according to the U.S. Department of Defense.

A part of the U.S. military's effort to reduce violence has been to pay former resistance fighters. Late in 2007, the U.S. military began paying monthly wages of 300 dollars to former militants, calling them now "concerned local citizens."

While this policy has cut violence in al-Anbar, it has also increased political divisions between the dominant Shia political party and the Sunnis the majority of these "concerned citizens" being paid are Sunni Muslims. Prime Minister Maliki has said these "concerned local citizens" will never be part of the government's security apparatus, which is predominantly composed of members of various Shia militias.

Underscoring another failure of the so-called surge is the fact that the U.S.-backed government in Baghdad remains more divided than ever, and hopes of reconciliation have vanished.

According to a recent ABC/BBC poll, 98 percent of Sunnis and 84 percent of Shia in Iraq want all U.S. forces out of the country.

Inter Press Service

comments on this article?
 
 
 
Archives

  • Finally, Iraqis Get Health Care on the Market
    3/8/2009

  • Iraqi Doctors in Hiding Treat as They Can
    2/22/2009

  • Still Homeless in Baghdad
    2/20/2009

  • The Tigris Too Tells the Story
    2/13/2009

  • No Unemployment Among Iraq's Gravediggers
    2/6/2009

  • Iraqis Look for Hope in Election Results
    2/2/2009

  • Threat of Violence Looms Again Over Fallujah
    1/31/2009

  • Tentative Hope Rises Ahead of Iraq Elections
    1/29/2009

  • Winter Soldiers: 'We Have to Share This Pain'
    10/21/2008

  • In Baghdad, Even the Hospitals Are Sick
    9/26/2008

  • Iraq War Vets Transforming Trauma
    9/20/2008

  • New Book Lets Winter Soldiers Be Heard
    9/17/2008

  • Journalist Charges Censorship by US Military in Fallujah
    7/4/2008

  • Winter Soldiers Hit the Streets
    6/4/2008

  • Iraq Vets: 'Enough Is Enough. It's Time to Get Out'
    6/3/2008

  • Five Years, No End in Sight
    3/19/2008

  • Iraq Vet: Rules of Engagement 'Thrown Out the Window'
    3/17/2008

  • Iraqi Women More Oppressed Than Ever
    3/7/2008

  • New Year Begins Unhappily In Iraq
    1/3/2008

  • 2007 Worst Year Yet in Iraq
    12/30/2007

  • Ill-Equipped Soldiers Opt for 'Search and Avoid'
    10/25/2007

  • The Royal Treatment: Saudi Involvement in Iraq Overlooked
    9/20/2007

  • In Beirut, Resistance Being Rebuilt Too
    5/8/2007

  • Lebanon's Palestinian Refugees Learn to Substitute Government
    5/3/2007

  • In Southern Lebanon, One Unexploded Bomb Per Person
    4/28/2007

  • Tensions Run High After Sunni Killings in Beirut
    4/28/2007

  • In Lebanon, Political Loyalties Being Rebuilt
    4/27/2007

  • This Protest Won't Go Away
    4/26/2007

  • In Lebanon, Tempers Rise Over Reconstruction
    4/24/2007

  • In Damascus, a Lot of Uninvited Guests
    4/19/2007

  • Iraqi Refugees Complicate Syria's Position
    4/18/2007

  • Small Iraqi Province in
    Big Trouble
    4/17/2007
  • More Archives


    Originally from Anchorage, Alaska, Dahr Jamail writes about the effects of the US occupation on the people of Iraq, since the mainstream media in the US has in large part, he believes, failed to do so.

    Dahr has spent a total of 5 months in occupied Iraq, and plans on returning in October to continue reporting on the occupation. One of only a few independent reporters in Iraq, Dahr will be using the DahrJamailIraq.com website and mailing list to disseminate his dispatches and will continue as special correspondent for Flashpoints Radio.

    Reproduction of material from any original Antiwar.com pages
    without written permission is strictly prohibited.
    Copyright 2014 Antiwar.com