Highlights
 
Quotable
The cry has been that when war is declared, all opposition should be hushed. A sentiment more unworthy of a free country could hardly be propagated.
William Ellery Channing
Original Letters Blog US Casualties Contact Donate

 
January 16, 2008

How the Pentagon Planted a False Story

by Gareth Porter

Senior Pentagon officials, evidently reflecting a broader administration policy decision, used an off-the-record Pentagon briefing to turn the Jan. 6 U.S.-Iranian incident in the Strait of Hormuz into a sensational story demonstrating Iran's military aggressiveness, a reconstruction of the events following the incident shows.

The initial press stories on the incident, all of which can be traced to a briefing by deputy assistant secretary of defense for public affairs in charge of media operations Bryan Whitman, contained similar information that has since been repudiated by the Navy itself.

Then the Navy disseminated a short video into which was spliced the audio of a phone call warning that U.S. warships would "explode" in "a few seconds." Although it was ostensibly a Navy production, IPS has learned that the ultimate decision on its content was made by top officials of the Defense Department.

The encounter between five small and apparently unarmed speedboats, each carrying a crew of two to four men, and the three U.S. warships occurred very early on Saturday Jan. 6, Washington time. But no information was released to the public about the incident for more than 24 hours, indicating that it was not viewed initially as being very urgent.

The reason for that absence of public information on the incident for more than a full day is that it was not that different from many others in the Gulf over more than a decade. A Pentagon consultant who asked not to be identified told IPS that he had spoken with officers who had experienced similar encounters with small Iranian boats throughout the 1990s, and that such incidents are "just not a major threat to the U.S. Navy by any stretch of the imagination."

Just two weeks earlier, on Dec. 19, the USS Whidbey Island, an amphibious warship, had fired warning shots after a small Iranian boat allegedly approached it at high speed. But that incident had gone without public notice.

With the reports from 5th Fleet commander Vice-Adm. Kevin Cosgriff in hand early that morning, top Pentagon officials had all day Sunday, Jan. 6, to discuss what to do about the encounter in the Strait of Hormuz. The result was a decision to play it up as a major incident.

The decision came just as President George W. Bush was about to leave on a Middle East trip aimed in part at rallying Arab states to join the United States in an anti-Iran coalition.

That decision in Washington was followed by a news release by the commander of the 5th Fleet on the incident at about 4:00 a.m. Washington time Jan. 7. It was the first time the 5th Fleet had ever issued a news release on an incident with small Iranian boats.

The release reported that the Iranian "small boats" had "maneuvered aggressively in close proximity of [sic] the Hopper [the lead ship of the three-ship convoy]." But it did not suggest that the Iranian boats had threatened the boats or that it had nearly resulted in firing on the Iranian boats.

On the contrary, the release made the U.S. warships handling of the incident sound almost routine. "Following standard procedures," the release said, "Hopper issued warnings, attempted to establish communications with the small boats, and conducted evasive maneuvering."

The release did not refer to a U.S. ship being close to firing on the Iranian boats, or to a call threatening that U.S. ships would "explode in a few minutes," as later stories would report, or to the dropping of objects into the path of a U.S. ship as a potential danger.

That press release was ignored by the news media, however, because later that Monday morning, the Pentagon provided correspondents with a very different account of the episode.

At 9 a.m., Barbara Starr of CNN reported that "military officials" had told her that the Iranian boats had not only carried out "threatening maneuvers," but had transmitted a message by radio that "I am coming at you" and "you will explode." She reported the dramatic news that the commander of one boat was "in the process of giving the order to shoot when they moved away."

CBS News broadcast a similar story, adding the detail that the Iranian boats "dropped boxes that could have been filled with explosives into the water." Other news outlets carried almost identical accounts of the incident.

The source of this spate of stories can now be identified as Bryan Whitman, the top Pentagon official in charge of media relations, who gave a press briefing for Pentagon correspondents that morning. Although Whitman did offer a few remarks on the record, most of the Whitman briefing was off the record, meaning that he could not be cited as the source.

In an apparent slip-up, however, an Associated Press story that morning cited Whitman as the source for the statement that U.S. ships were about to fire when the Iranian boats turned and moved away – a part of the story that other correspondents had attributed to an unnamed Pentagon official.

On Jan. 9, the U.S. Navy released excerpts of a video of the incident in which a strange voice – one that was clearly very different from the voice of the Iranian officer who calls the U.S. ship in the Iranian video – appears to threaten the U.S. warships.

A separate audio recording of that voice, which came across the VHF channel open to anyone with access to it, was spliced into a video on which the voice apparently could not be heard. That was a political decision, and Lt. Col. Mark Ballesteros of the Pentagon's Public Affairs Office told IPS the decision on what to include in the video was "a collaborative effort of leadership here, the Central Command, and Navy leadership in the field."

"Leadership here," of course, refers to the secretary of defense and other top policymakers at the department. An official in the U.S. Navy Office of Information in Washington, who asked not to be identified because of the sensitivity of the issue, said that decision was made in the office of the secretary of defense

That decision involved a high risk of getting caught in an obvious attempt to mislead. As an official at 5th Fleet headquarters in Bahrain told IPS, it is common knowledge among officers there that hecklers – often referred to as "Filipino Monkey" – frequently intervene on the VHF ship-to-ship channel to make threats or rude comments.

One of the popular threats made by such hecklers, according to British journalist Lewis Page, who had transited the Strait with the Royal Navy is, "Look out, I am going to hit [collide with] you."

By Jan. 11, Pentagon spokesman Geoff Morrell was already disavowing the story that Whitman had been instrumental in creating only four days earlier. "No one in the military has said that the transmission emanated from those boats," said Morrell.

The other elements of the story given to Pentagon correspondents were also discredited. The commanding officer of the guided missile cruiser Port Royal, Capt. David Adler, dismissed the Pentagon's story that he had felt threatened by the dropping of white boxes in the water. Meeting with reporters on Monday, Adler said, "I saw them float by. They didn't look threatening to me."

The naval commanders seemed most determined, however, to scotch the idea that they had been close to firing on the Iranians. Vice-Adm. Kevin Cosgriff, the commander of the 5th Fleet, denied the story in a press briefing on Jan. 7. A week later, Cmdr. Jeffery James, commander of the destroyer Hopper, told reporters that the Iranians had moved away "before we got to the point where we needed to open fire."

The decision to treat the Jan. 6 incident as evidence of an Iranian threat reveals a chasm between the interests of political officials in Washington and Navy officials in the Gulf. Asked whether the Navy's reporting of the episode was distorted by Pentagon officials, Cmdr. Robertson of 5th Fleet Public Affairs would not comment directly. But she said, "There is a different perspective over there."

(Inter Press Service)

comments on this article?
 
 

Gareth Porter's Bio

Gareth Porter is an investigative journalist and historian specializing in U.S. foreign and military policy. His latest book is Perils of Dominance: Imbalance of Power and the Road to War in Vietnam (University of California Press).

Archives

  • Despite Obama's Vow, Combat Brigades Will Stay in Iraq
    3/26/2009

  • McKiernan Gets Control of Disputed Raids
    3/21/2009

  • Plan to Split Taliban Lures Obama Deeper Into War
    3/17/2009

  • Iran's Anti-Israel Rhetoric Aimed at Arab Opinion
    3/10/2009

  • US Military Dominance in Mideast Proven a Costly Myth
    3/6/2009

  • Drawdown Plan May Leave Combat Brigades in Iraq
    2/28/2009

  • Obama Nixed Full Afghan Surge After Quizzing Brass
    2/21/2009

  • Commanders in Iraq Challenge Petraeus on Pullout Risk
    2/18/2009

  • Intel Estimate Muddied Iran's Nuclear Intent
    2/14/2009

  • Petraeus Leaked Misleading Story on Pullout Plans
    2/10/2009

  • Generals Seek to Reverse Obama Withdrawal Decision
    2/3/2009

  • Is Gates Undermining Another Opening to Iran?
    1/28/2009

  • Israel Rejected Hamas Cease-Fire Offer in December
    1/10/2009

  • Bush Plan Eliminated Obstacle to Gaza Assault
    1/6/2009

  • US Military Defiant on Key Terms of Iraqi Pact
    12/19/2008

  • Iran's Regional Power Rooted in Shia Ties
    12/17/2008

  • Is a US-Iran Deal on the Middle East Possible?
    12/16/2008

  • Economy, Ties with West Are Key to Iran Polls
    12/13/2008

  • Iranian Analysts Urge Obama Not to Delay Action on Talks
    12/12/2008

  • Iranian Leaders Debate Obama's Policy Freedom
    12/11/2008

  • JFK Episode Suggests Obama's Iraq Plan at Risk
    11/28/2008

  • Pact Will End Iraqi Dependence on US Military
    11/19/2008

  • US Task Force Found Few Iranian Arms in Iraq
    11/16/2008

  • Obama Pressured to Back Off Iraq Withdrawal
    11/13/2008

  • US Cutoff Threat Unlikely to Save Iraq Troop Pact
    10/30/2008

  • Final Text of Iraq Pact Reveals a US Debacle
    10/23/2008

  • Fears of Blowback Nixed Afghan Air Strikes in 2004
    10/21/2008

  • Afghan Peace Talks Widen US-UK Rift on War Policy
    10/10/2008

  • Bush Had No Plan to Catch Bin Laden After 9/11
    9/30/2008

  • Vested Interests Drove New Pakistan Policy
    9/18/2008

  • Intel Council Warned Against Raids in Pakistan
    9/9/2008

  • Why Iraqi 'Client' Blocked US Long-Term Presence
    9/2/2008

  • Georgia War Rooted in US Self-Deceit on NATO
    8/25/2008

  • Bush Covered Up Musharraf Ties With al-Qaeda, Khan
    8/20/2008

  • AP's Iran-Trained Hit Squads Story: Iraq News Nadir?
    8/18/2008

  • US Officials Admit Worry over a 'Difficult' al-Maliki
    8/16/2008

  • How Tenet Betrayed the CIA on WMD in Iraq
    8/9/2008

  • Bush Forced al-Maliki to Back Down on Pullout in 2006
    7/29/2008

  • Bush, US Military Pressure Iraqis on Withdrawal
    7/25/2008

  • Seismic Shift or Non-Decision by Bush on Iran?
    7/19/2008

  • Pullout Demand Signals Final Bush Defeat in Iraq
    7/11/2008

  • Did IAEA Revive Uranium Paper Issue Under Pressure?
    7/9/2008

  • Official Says Iran Accepts P5+1 Talks Proposal
    7/3/2008

  • Anti-Iran Arguments Belie Fearmongering
    7/1/2008

  • Fear of US-Sunni Ties Undercut Security Talks
    6/25/2008

  • Coercive Diplomacy Disputed at Centrist Meet
    6/14/2008

  • Bush Pledges on Iraq Bases Pact Were a Ruse
    6/13/2008

  • Fearing Escalation, Pentagon Fought Cheney Iran Plan
    6/11/2008

  • How Cheney Outfoxed His Foes on Iran and EFPs
    6/3/2008

  • Where Are Those Iranian Weapons in Iraq?
    5/22/2008

  • Maliki Stalls US Plan to Frame Iran
    5/15/2008

  • Pentagon Targeted Iran for Regime Change After 9/11
    5/6/2008

  • Petraeus Promotion Frees Cheney to Threaten Iran
    4/24/2008

  • Petraeus Hid Maliki Resistance to US Troops in Basra
    4/18/2008

  • Petraeus Testimony to Defend False 'Proxy War' Line
    4/8/2008

  • Embarrassed US Starts to Disown Basra Operation
    4/1/2008

  • Sadr Offensive Shows Failure of Petraeus Strategy
    3/27/2008

  • McCain's Gaffes Reflect Bush's Iran-al-Qaeda Myth
    3/22/2008

  • My Lai Probe Hid Policy that Led to Massacre
    3/16/2008

  • Dissenting Views Made Fallon's Fall Inevitable
    3/12/2008

  • Fallon's 'No Iran War' Line Angered White House
    3/8/2008

  • Sunni Insurgents Exploit US-Sponsored Militias
    3/4/2008

  • Iran Nuke Laptop Data Came from Terror Group
    3/1/2008

  • Accept Iran's Regional Role, Says French Envoy
    2/5/2008

  • US Officials Rejected Key Source on '94 Argentina Bombing
    1/24/2008
  • Reproduction of material from any original Antiwar.com pages without written permission is strictly prohibited.
    Copyright 2014 Antiwar.com