Highlights

 
Quotable
Guard against the impostures of pretended patriotism.
George Washington
Original Letters Blog US Casualties Contact Donate

 
August 15, 2008

'Provincial Saddam' Goes, Finally


by Ahmed Ali and Dahr Jamail

BAQUBA - The surprise removal of the Diyala police chief has brought new hope of a more secure future.

The decision by members of the ruling council of Diyala governorate to discharge provincial police chief Ghanim al-Quraishi brought celebrations in its wake. In Baquba, 25 mi. northeast of Baghdad and capital of Diyala province, Quraishi has long been a controversial figure.

"Police chief Ghanim al-Quraishi gave orders to organize the fighting in this district [Hwaider] very secretly," a policeman in the 2nd battalion told IPS on the condition of anonymity. "The 2nd battalion of Iraqi police moved to Hwaider, whose people witnessed severe military clashes between the Mahdi Army and police."

Quraishi has been accused of supporting the U.S.-and-Iranian-backed Badr militia, which has clashed with Shia cleric Moqtada al-Sadr's Mahdi Army militia, as well as the U.S.-backed Sahwa forces, which are dominated by Sunni Muslims.

"A big verbal quarrel took place earlier [in the governor's office] between al-Quraishi, who is a Badr member, and followers of Sadr," a second policeman, also speaking on the condition of anonymity, told IPS. "The Sadrists accused Quraishi of targeting the Mahdi."

And so the majority of people in Baquba, whether they are sympathetic to the Sahwa, the Mahdi Army, or to non-affiliated Iraqi security forces, are happy to see the removal of Quraishi.

After the announcement was first made Aug. 11, neither Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki nor the Ministry of Interior Affairs acted on the council's recommendation. People were told by the Ministry of Interior Affairs that Quraishi continued as chief of police regardless of the council's decision.

The next day, Aug. 12, several policemen led by Quraishi demonstrated outside the building of the ruling council and insulted members who had supported his expulsion.

The orchestrated demonstration was filmed by a local cameraman, who sent a tape to Prime Minister Maliki in Baghdad. It was then that Maliki ordered the discharge of Quraishi. Ministry of Interior Affairs spokesman Abdul-Kareem Khalaf was named acting police chief.

About the same time as the demonstration, a suicide bomber attacked the convoy of the governor of Diyala, Raad Rasheed, in Baquba. The governor escaped unharmed but at least one civilian was killed. Iraqi officials immediately imposed a curfew over the city that lasted until Wednesday morning.

Later Tuesday night, about 8 p.m., Quraishi surrendered his responsibilities and left office.

People of Baquba, Shias and Sunnis together, congratulated one another on the removal of a "post-occupation dictator." Quraishi, a Shia, had his own militia called the "Khirnabat men."

Quraishi's convoys consisted of 120 fighters as his protection group and 20 armored vehicles. Few could challenge his authority, not even the governor.

Quraishi, who was a general in Saddam Hussein's military, was backed by the Supreme Islamic Iraqi Council (SIIC), the most powerful Shia group in the Baghdad government.

"The second Saddam has gone," a trader who referred to himself as Abu Ali told IPS. "We look forward to better times."

(Inter Press Service)

comments on this article?
 
 
Archives

  • Iraqi Hospitals Suffer From Corruption, Shortages
    12/16/2008

  • Iraq Kidnappings Now Become 'Unofficial'
    8/30/2008

  • Sectarian Clashes Flare Up Again in Iraq
    8/27/2008

  • 'Provincial Saddam' Goes, Finally
    8/15/2008

  • Iraqi Sunnis Complain of Increased Iranian Influence
    8/14/2008

  • Iran May Gain From Iraq's Suffering
    8/8/2008

  • New Iraq Operation Gets Surprise Support
    8/6/2008

  • Iraqis Skeptical About Obama, McCain
    6/25/2008

  • Iraq's Widows Victims of Occupation, Social Codes
    6/19/2008

  • Iraqis Running Out of Water in Rising Heat
    5/10/2008

  • Tense Truce Between Awakening Groups and Iraqi Government
    4/9/2008

  • Shia Battles Spread to Baquba
    4/8/2008

  • In Iraq, Childhood Is a Thing of the Past
    3/11/2008

  • In Baquba, Happiness Is a Memory
    3/8/2008

  • Sahwa Forces Challenge Govt, and Win
    3/6/2008

  • Tensions Rise Between 'Awakening' and Iraqi Govt Forces
    3/1/2008

  • Occupation Strangles Farmers
    3/1/2008

  • Baquba Losing Life and Hope
    2/28/2008

  • Iraq Unemployment Too Becomes an Epidemic
    2/21/2008

  • Iraqis Still Left in the Dark
    2/16/2008

  • A New Force Called Sahwa Shows Its Muscle
    2/14/2008

  • US-Backed Groups Challenge Iraqi Government
    2/12/2008

  • In Iraq, Learning Can Be Dangerous
    2/12/2008

  • Violence Draws Veil Over Women
    2/1/2008

  • Iraqis: 'US the Biggest Producer of Terror'
    1/26/2008

  • Baquba: Under Curfew, This Is No Life
    1/25/2008

  • Fuel Crisis Freezes Iraqi Life
    1/10/2008

  • Iraqi Govt to Slash Food Rations Despite Far Higher Budget Than Saddam
    12/28/2007

  • Education Is the Latest Casualty in Baquba
    12/11/2007

  • Corruption Adds to Baquba's Problems
    11/16/2007

  • Iraq: Millions Trapped in Their Own Country
    11/6/2007

  • In Baquba, Better Security Brings No Reassurance
    11/3/2007

  • Many Iraqis Search Hopelessly for the Kidnapped
    9/5/2007

  • Iraqi Children Robbed of Childhood
    9/3/2007

  • Baquba Caught Between the US and Al-Qaeda
    8/21/2007

  • Sectarianism Splits Security in Diyala
    8/8/2007

  • Baquba Denied the Healing Touch
    7/26/2007

  • Baquba: Living in a Dead City
    7/24/2007

  • In Baquba, Mass Graves Dug to Deal With Death Toll
    7/18/2007

  • Iraq: Al-Qaeda Escapes U.S. Assault
    7/15/2007
  • Ahmed Ali and Dahr Jamail write for Inter Press Service.

    Reproduction of material from any original Antiwar.com pages
    without written permission is strictly prohibited.
    Copyright 2014 Antiwar.com